Essay about banned books

I was perhaps too optimistic to end the Handmaid's story with an outright failure. Even Nineteen Eighty-Four , that darkest of literary visions, does not end with a boot stamping on a human face for ever, or with a broken Winston Smith feeling a drunken love for Big Brother, but with an essay about the regime written in the past tense and in standard English. Similarly, I allowed my Handmaid a possible escape, via Maine and Canada; and I also permitted an epilogue, from the perspective of which both the Handmaid and the world she lived in have receded into history. When asked whether The Handmaid's Tale is about to "come true", I remind myself that there are two futures in the book, and that if the first one comes true, the second one may do so also.

All this does not mean that Italian fascism was tolerant. Gramsci was put in prison until his death; the opposition leaders Giacomo Matteotti and the brothers Rosselli were assassinated; the free press was abolished, the labor unions were dismantled, and political dissenters were confined on remote islands. Legislative power became a mere fiction and the executive power (which controlled the judiciary as well as the mass media) directly issued new laws, among them laws calling for preservation of the race (the formal Italian gesture of support for what became the Holocaust).

Fantastic to make these books available for anyone. Just know the American Library Association’s annual list of book is faked to promote its own interests. For example it has reported the #1 most “banned” book was challenged dozens of times one year when the actual number was four. I know, I called the man who collated the list, Bryan Campbell. Four challenges all year across the entire USA for the #1 book on the list is about as non newsworthy as it gets. That’s why ALA never releases the actual numbers of the actual challenges, not even to the authors themselves. It’s minuscule, relatively speaking. Remember, ALA is the organization saying libraries should not use filters because porn viewing is minuscule, but here book “banning” is actually minuscule, unlike prone viewing, and that gets trumped up into major news.

1. Harry Potter (series), by . Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War , by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three , by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men , by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings , by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Myracle, Lauren
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower , by Stephen Chbosky

Essay about banned books

essay about banned books

1. Harry Potter (series), by . Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War , by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three , by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men , by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings , by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Myracle, Lauren
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower , by Stephen Chbosky

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