Communication for nurses essays

This site serves the information needs of nurses who work in medical/surgical, intensive care, emergency, trauma, critical care, pediatrics, geriatrics, operating room, postanesthesia, obstetrics/gynecologic, neonatal, neurologic, oncology, psychiatric, and other settings. It provides leading-edge content for staff nurses, nursing administrators, directors, business executives, nurse educators, case managers, primary nurses, clinical nurse specialists, community health nurses, public health nurses, school nurses, office nurses, nurse faculty members, head nurses, patient care coordinators, nurse anesthetists, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, nurse researchers, consultants, supervisors, assistants, and others. Reflecting the convenience and power of the Internet, provides a convenient source of clinical, professional, drug, licensure, regulation, research, patient education, legal, and ethical nursing information.

Communication styles can be motivating or demotivating in any profession, and especially so in stressful, busy nursing environments. Commit to using positive communication with nurses to develop a friendly, caring and supportive atmosphere and to provide training on positive, caring communication for staff nurses. Start nursing shifts in a positive way by greeting staff nurses at the beginning of their work day. Schedule regular one-to-one time with each nurse, whether it's daily or weekly, to listen, ask for feedback, communicate expectations, offer advice and get to know nurses and their career and work goals. Provide support for specific problems they experience; for example, if a nurse is expressing frustration with a difficult patient, assign a more experienced nurse or a particularly caring and empathetic nurse assistant to partner with the nurse on that patient's care. Or make it a point to touch base with the nurse daily on the difficult patient's progress for some stress relief. Good manners, friendly interactions and positive language motivate nurses to model the same, provide calming interactions in stressful situations and encourage good working relationships.

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Janice B. Foust, PhD, RN, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston, College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing, she later graduated with a Master of Science degree in nursing from Boston College as a clinical nurse specialist. She earned her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing where she also completed her post-doctoral training as a Claire M. Fagin Fellow, John A. Hartford Foundation, Building Academic Nursing Capacity program, guided by her mentor, Mary D. Naylor, PhD, FAAN, RN. Dr. Foust’s program of research focuses on care transitions of older adults, and more specifically, on the issues of post-hospital medication management. She has published several articles and book chapters along with presenting her work at local, regional and national conferences. Dr. Foust has also served as manuscript reviewer on national and international journals. Dr. Foust has held clinical, research and leadership positions within various practice settings such as home healthcare and academic teaching hospitals. 

Communication for nurses essays

communication for nurses essays

Janice B. Foust, PhD, RN, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston, College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing, she later graduated with a Master of Science degree in nursing from Boston College as a clinical nurse specialist. She earned her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing where she also completed her post-doctoral training as a Claire M. Fagin Fellow, John A. Hartford Foundation, Building Academic Nursing Capacity program, guided by her mentor, Mary D. Naylor, PhD, FAAN, RN. Dr. Foust’s program of research focuses on care transitions of older adults, and more specifically, on the issues of post-hospital medication management. She has published several articles and book chapters along with presenting her work at local, regional and national conferences. Dr. Foust has also served as manuscript reviewer on national and international journals. Dr. Foust has held clinical, research and leadership positions within various practice settings such as home healthcare and academic teaching hospitals. 

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